Photo gallery: ‘Kin Killin’ Kin’ artist James Pate’s daylong visit

James Pate told students that art is a process. His advice to students is "to persevere and hang in with a piece of work. It's going to turn a corner and look good right before your eyes.
James Pate told MCC students that art is a process. His advice is “to persevere and hang in with a piece of work. It’s going to turn a corner and look good right before your eyes.”

Metropolitan Community College was honored to host Ohio artist James Pate Feb. 2 on the MCC-Penn Valley campus. Pate, who was here as part of a two-week exhibition of his traveling series “Kin Killin’ Kin,” spoke to social justice and art students at the Carter Art Center Gallery in the morning. He wrapped up his day with a public lecture at the campus’ Little Theater. About 150 people attended the evening event.

For more information about the exhibit, read our previous story.

Our thanks to the Brooks Institute at MCC, the MCC-Penn Valley Social Science Division and the MCC-Penn Valley African American Faculty and Staff Association for sponsoring the exhibit and Pate’s visit. (Photos by Matt Scharhag, Clare Otto and Bernadette Torres/MCC)

James Pates talks with students at the MCC-Penn Valley Carter Art Center Gallery.
James Pate talks with students at the MCC-Penn Valley Carter Art Center Gallery.
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Student Nasia King called Pate’s work “brilliant” and “powerful.”
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The “Kin Killin’ Kin” exhibit included 13 charcoal drawings and one oil painting on Plexiglas.
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Bernadette Torres, Carter Art Center Gallery director, and James Pate
James Pate and Merrell Bennekin
James Pate and Merrell Bennekin, MCC adjunct social science instructor
James Pate with BT, MB and students
James Pate with students from MCC classes instructed by Bernadette Torres, Carter Art Center Gallery director (far left), and Merrell Bennekin, adjunct social science teacher (far right)
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Pate offers insight into his works at a public lecture in the MCC-Penn Valley Little Theater.
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“I place historical imagery in some of the compositions with the hope that an adolescent will recognize the bloodline connection and feel a real sense of their heritage beyond their parents and grandparents,” Pate says in his artist’s statement.

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