Equipped for success: Grant helps MCC-BT program purchase 3-D scanner

Mike Cline, program coordinator for Engineering Technology and Computer-Aided Design and Drafting, said the department's new 3D scanner will help take students to the next level.
Mike Cline, program coordinator for Engineering Technology and Computer Aided Design and Drafting, said the department’s new 3-D scanner will help take students to the next level.

It didn’t take Mike Cline long to begin using a new 3-D laser scanner in an Engineering Technology (ETEC) classroom. Just days after the device arrived, he was making plans to use it for a final during the spring 2016 semester.

“One idea is for our students to use the printer to help them create a draft of a catwalk that goes from the balcony across the Exhibit Hall,” said Cline, the program coordinator for ETEC and Computer Aided Design and Drafting (CADD) at Metropolitan Community College-Business & Technology. “I thought that would be a great final project.”

The Faro scanner, purchased for about $46,000 and partially funded with the 50/50 grant, produced this image of the Prototype Lab at MCC-BT.
The Faro scanner, purchased for about $46,000 and partially funded with the 50/50 grant, produced this image of the Prototype Lab at MCC-BT.

The Faro Focus 3-D is ideal for indoor and outdoor applications. The device features precision scanning up to 100 yards. It enables fast, straightforward and accurate measurements of objects and buildings.

The scanner records architectural facades, complex structures, production and supply facilities, accident sites and large-volume components. The image here, for example, is a scan of MCC-BT’s Prototype Lab.

“This is a great tool for our students and for the faculty,” Cline said. “It’s important for us to provide our students with this kind of equipment. It will have an impact on their coursework.”

Cline and Brenna Gargotta, a lab specialist at MCC-BT, researched scanners before settling on the Faro Focus 3-D. It cost about $46,000 and was partially funded by Missouri’s 50/50 Career Education Equipment grant.

Cline said the scanner will be utilized by multiple programs on campus.