4th Annual Boy Scout Merit Badge Round-Up at MCC-BT

MCC-Business & Technology hosted 50 Boy Scouts for our 4th annual Boy Scout Merit Badge Round-Up on Saturday, January 24.

Troops from Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, and Missouri attended our 4th Merit Badge Round-Up.
Troops from Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, and Missouri attended our 4th Merit Badge Round-Up.
Several MCC employees are active in Boy Scouts.  Above, Jim Beachner, MCC's Network and IT Support Technician and active Scout Leader, makes announcements to our visitors before starting their merit badge workshops.
Several MCC employees are active in Boy Scouts and volunteer their time to coordinate the Merit Badge Round-Up. Above, Jim Beachner, MCC’s Network and IT Support Technician and active Scout Leader, makes announcements to our visitors before starting their merit badge workshops.
Scouts in the welding merit badge workshop spent the first half of the day learning about shop safty and metalurgy and the second half of the day in the shop learning to weld.
Scouts in the welding merit badge workshop spent the first half of the day learning about shop safety and metallurgy and the second half of the day in the shop learning to weld.
Scouts in the metal work workshops learned to read blueprints and then cut and shape sheet metal according to the instructions.
Scouts earning their metal working merit badge learned to read blueprints and then cut and shape sheet metal according to the instructions.
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Scout leaders and merit badge instructors guide scouts step-by-step through the fabrication process in the metal working workshop.
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Scouts build a metal dustpan in the MCC-BT sheet metal lab as part of the requirements for their metal working merit badge.
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Scouts in the woodworking merit badge workshop learn to measure and cut lumber.
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Woodworking merit badge instructor and MCC-BT Engineering Technology Program Coordinator, Mike Cline teaches scouts how to safely use a compound miter saw.
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After grinding a point on their metal punch, scouts in the metal working workshop temper the sharp point with a cutting torch. When the metal is heated and cooled rapidly, molecules align to make the the tip extremely hard while the other end is soft and won’t shatter if hit with a hammer.