Area HS students learn tech skills at MCC-BT

Twenty eight high school students from North Kansas City, Independence, and Alta Vista school districts have been attending morning classes at MCC-Business & Technology as part of the new Early College program.  These students learn skills and earn up to 20 college credits in the fields of Drafting/Engineering Technology or Industrial Technology.

Mason Drew, left, and Jacob Hughes learn about electrical principles by testing resistance, current, and voltage in the Electronics lab at MCC-BT.
After a few weeks of class, students in the Industrial Technology program are learning how to restrict and control electricity.  Mason Drew, left, and Jacob Hughes learn about electrical principles by testing resistance, current, and voltage in the Electronics lab at MCC-BT.
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Rebekah Brent uses a diode chart, voltage meter, and bread board to create a circuit used in a wide variety of electronics. As these students build their skills and understanding over the next two years, they will begin diagnosing and repairing industrial equipment like robotic arms, conveyor systems, and electric motors.
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Gene Johnson, left, helps students understand how to use electrical prints and instructions to create and repair circuits.  Students that complete the two year Early College Industrial Technology program will earn 20 college credits that can be applied towards a college certificate or degree.  These students will also have the skills to land an entry level job in the industrial technology field by the time of their high school graduation.
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Arturo Gonzalez builds his fundamental design skills using a drafting table, pencil, and paper to create the first big project of the semester, a birdhouse.  As students progress through the two-year program, they will build their design skills using a variety of computer design software like Autodesk Inventor, AutoCad, and Revit.
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Students in the Engineering Technology program visit the FabLab every Friday to build the birdhouses they designed. As these designs take shape, many students realize their design flaws or impractical ideas.  A few students have scrapped plans to incorporate a swimming pool, fountain, or two-car garage in their birdhouse design.
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Chris Page, Lab Technician at MCC-BT, helps Kenneth Butcher cut his lumber to size. Students must design their birdhouse so that it can be built from a single 8ft 1″X6″ board.
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Zak Wilcox uses a chisel to carve away wood from his birdhouse entrance. Zak’s birdhouse will resemble a camper trailer when he is finished, complete with a tiny hitch and luggage rack on top. As students progress through the two-year Early College Drafting/Engineering Technology program they will design and build several projects, each incorporating additional skills and knowledge.

Read more about the Early College program here.